PHOTOSPORT

Aotearoa’s tamariki gear up for World Cup with 'CRIC-KIDS'

A ground-breaking initiative for young learners based around the game of cricket - Te Kapu Kirīkiti Wahine o Te Ao 2022 Hōtaka Ako – was lauched by organisers of the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022 in Northland today.

Aimed at Kiwi kids aged 7-13, the CRIC-KIDS education resource is available in both Te reo Māori and English. It brings to life the excitement of the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022 (CWC22) in a learning context, particularly highlighting the importance of Hauora and wellbeing.

Registrations are now open here for Kura Kaupapa Māori, schools and community groups - with the CRIC-KIDS resource available by 31 August in time for Term four 2021. 

Today’s launch had a fitting location – the Waitangi Treaty Grounds – overlooking the beach that played host to one of Aotearoa’s earliest recorded games of cricket on 20 December, 1832.

Today, students from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Pukemiro and Paihia School were back out playing cricket on the nation’s most iconic stretch of lawn – with WHITE FERNS captain Sophie Devine and team mates Suzie Bates and Lea Tahuhu (both Ngai Tahu) among the activators putting the youngsters through their paces. 

“This initiative is an awesome way for teachers and students from all over the country to get amongst the World Cup action – even if this is their first time engaging with cricket,” Tahuhu said.

“It’s great to see cricket embracing Te reo Māori while celebrating the CWC22 coming to Aotearoa for the third time in its history.

“As a mum, I think it’s really important to have educational resources that highlight the importance of hauora and wellbeing, as well as the physical benefits of playing sport.”

CRIC-KIDS contains a range of 45 stand-alone tasks, created by kaiako (teachers), aligned to the National Curriculum (Te Mārautanga o Aotearoa (TMoA) and The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC). Educators can choose to do one task, or all 45, making the resource incredibly user friendly.

“This resource is designed so kaiako, community group leaders or even holiday programme co-ordinators can simply take the tasks they want to engage with and tailor their programmes to their requirements,” CRIC-KIDS creator Tracy Bowker said.

“We hope kaiako find the tasks easy to implement into planning and ākonga are engaged in the learning."

Former Kura Kaupapa Māori kaiako and Māori language professional Maika Te Amo translated the resource into Te Reo.

“I was excited to be a part of this project where we could bring together the Māori worldview, the game of cricket and Te reo Māori to create a real legacy piece,” Te Amo said.

“This is a first for cricket and I can’t wait to see young tamariki around the country join the fun of Te Kapu Kirīkiti Wahine o Te Ao 2022 and have a go at some of the awesome tasks in the programme.”

Schools and community organisations can apply to receive CWC22 cricket sets to assist with physical ‘Have a go!’ tasks. They’ll also have the opportunity to secure tickets to attend matches in their host city.

CRIC-KIDS will enable young learners (years 3 – 8) around Aotearoa to get behind the country’s hosting of the tournament in the classroom, backyard and the nation’s packed out stadia.

Thanks to Māori Women’s Development Incoporated (MWDI), over 6,000 tamariki from across the country will also get the exciting opportunity to see the world’s best cricketers in action. MWDI announced today it had already secured 200 tickets to each of the tournament’s 31 matches.

The initiative, led by MWDI CEO Teresa Tepania-Ashton and MP Louisa Wall, will provide Māori girls and boys from all six host cities (Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin) with the chance to be a part of this epic global event.

“If you can see it then you can believe it. This opportunity for our tamariki to watch some of the best cricketers in the world can only inspire them to pursue their passions whatever they may be. I am incredibly grateful as a CWC22 Champion that MWDI Trustees have invested in tamariki participation too to ensure our indigenous children benefit from us hosting this world class sporting event.” Wall said.

MWDI Chairperson Druis Barrett is reminded of a quote used by her fellow Trustee, Dame June Mariu, a  former Silver Fern netballer and basketball representative.

“I am what I am because of the people around me. That's what it’s about, you never do these things alone. There was a lot of people who had the same aspirations that I had.”

ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022 CEO, Andrea Nelson says: “Hosting a global event such as the CWC22 is all about creating a long-lasting legacy for the country and the sport.

“I’m very excited to see Kura Kaupapa Māori, schools and community groups take up the resource and adapting it to their own classrooms in a way that works for them.

“The kaupapa of this tournament is all about making it as accessible as possible for as many Kiwi as possible. We’re very pleased that organisations such as MWDI are leveraging CWC22 to showcase the power of women’s sport to our country’s youngsters.

“There’s already a lot excitement surrounding the tournament and I’m looking forward to seeing tamariki and their whānau out in droves when the best teams in the world come to town in March and April of 2022.”

CRIC-KIDS has been designed in partnership with the Ministry of Education, Kaiako (teachers) and New Zealand Cricket.

New Zealand Cricket’s Community Cricket Advisor Andrew Tara said: “NZC’s overriding strategy is for cricket to be a game for all New Zealanders and the CWC22 Education Programme is a fantastic way for us to engage with young Māori tamariki.

“Whether they’re already involved with the game or they’ve never been exposed to cricket before – this resource is one way we can introduce young tamariki around Aotearoa to the opportunities within our great game,” he said.

The CRIC-KIDS Education Programme is part of the ‘In Our Backyard’ project, where the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022, NZ Rugby, NZ Football, and Yachting NZ have joined forces to make the most of New Zealand hosting three Women’s World Cups and the Sailing Grand Prix and further shape learning through sport in New Zealand schools and kura.

Sport NZ is leading this project, which, in addition to the four sports, also involves the Ministry of Education, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.

“We saw with the America’s Cup earlier this year a surge of interest from schools and kura wanting to learn through the context of sailing. Yachting NZ did a great job of delivering a programme called Kōkōkaha that supported tamariki to learn about wind and to design technologies to harness its power,” said Sport NZ CEO Raelene Castle .

“To build on this momentum, we’ve set up In Our Backyard to help cricket, rugby, football and yachting reinvent and coordinate how they engage with schools and kura as a legacy of hosting their respective major events, rather than working alone which has been the traditional approach for event-based schools programmes.”  

In Our Backyard also complements the Healthy Active Learning initiative, a joint government collaboration between Sport NZ and the Ministries of Health and Education designed to improve the wellbeing of tamariki through healthy eating and drinking and quality physical activity.

For tournament information, fixtures and all the latest ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022 news, go to https://www.icc-cricket.com/cwc22.

ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022 at a glance

  • Hosted in New Zealand from 4 March to 3 April, 2022
  • Eight nations
  • 31 matches
  • Six host cities: Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, Wellington, Christchurch, Dunedin

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